Auction Preview

Worldwide Monterey 2017
  • August 8, 2017
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Worldwide Auctioneers is a newcomer to Monterey Car Week, and with so many events and auctions going on, it isn’t easy competing for the attention of enthusiasts and buyers scurrying all over the peninsula. Even so, following a strong debut auction in Scottsdale earlier this year, Worldwide has an impressive group of 70 automobiles and motorcycles set to cross the block on Aug. 17. Here are 10 of the cars that we’ll be keeping a particularly close eye on as action unfolds in Pacific Grove, Calif.

1963 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 Tanker
Presale estimate: $400,000 – $500,000
Hagerty Price Guide:  $275,000 – $700,000
Lot: 19

1963 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 Tanker

It wasn’t quite a match for the Cobras, but the 1963 Z06 was a serious competition-spec Corvette that included a Fuelie engine, close-ratio M20 4-speed, Positraction, metallic brake linings, finned brake drums, and competition suspension. Buyers could also opt for a 36-gallon fuel tank, and those that were so equipped have become known as “Tankers.” This one was purchased new and was briefly raced by a young woman before her disapproving father found out. It was restored in the early 1990s and sold out of the Otis Chandler collection in 2006 for $330,000. Worldwide put it up for sale in Scottsdale earlier this year, but a high bid of $440,000 wasn’t enough to take it.

1939 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 Sport Berlinetta by Touring
Presale estimate: $1,800,000 – $2,400,000
Hagerty Price Guide: N/A
Lot: 26

1939 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 Sport Berlinetta by Touring

Produced both before and after World War II, the 2500 was the last of Alfa’s 6C series of sports cars and was available with either single or triple Weber carburetors. The 6C 2500 was built in several versions and with numerous different bodies, but this one has the desirable combination of top-spec triple carb engine and coupe bodywork by Touring. It was also restored recently and is advertised as being in concours condition.

1963 ASA 1000 GT
Presale estimate: $125,000 – $150,000
Hagerty Price Guide: $72,000 – $125,000
Lot: 12

1963 ASA 1000 GT

These little Bertone-bodied sports cars were actually the brainchild of Enzo Ferrari, who wanted to build a smaller and cheaper model to reach a broader market, or what Autosport called “a small-capacity sporting car, built to the engineering standards of Ferrari.” Eventually, he sold the design rights to Milan-based Autocostruzioni Societá per Azioni (ASA), which was backed by the wealthy De Nora family. ASA retained engineer Giotto Bizzarrini to do development work. Only about 60 were built, as the price proved to be too high for such a small car. This one was reportedly Oronzio De Nora’s personal car. It was restored in 2014.

1940 BMW 328 Roadster
Presale estimate: $1,500,000 – $2,000,000
Hagerty Price Guide: N/A
Lot: 44

1940 BMW 328 Roadster

The 328 is the most famous of the prewar BMWs, and a handful of them were given lightweight bodywork by Carrozzeria Touring with racing in mind. The history of this example is a bit hazy, but it is represented as having been reunited and restored with its original chassis, powertrain, and Touring coachwork.

1968 Chevrolet Corvette L88 Sunray-DX Race Car
Presale estimate: $950,000 – $1,250,000
Hagerty Price Guide: $456,000 – $789,000
Lot: 59

1968 Chevrolet Corvette L-88 Sunray-DX Race Car (Worldwide Auctioneers)

Worldwide has not one but two significant L-88 race cars on offer this year. One has numerous SCCA A-Production wins to its credit, but this one is even more notable as one of the cars built by Don Yenko for the Sunray-DX oil company. It raced at both Sebring and Daytona, established a GT-class lap record at Sebring, and was driven by both Peter Revson and Pedro Rodriguez, as well as Yenko himself. Barrett-Jackson offered it in Scottsdale two years ago, but the high bid of $1.1M didn’t reach the minimum.

1937 Delahaye 135 M Coupe
Presale estimate: $1,700,000 – $2,100,000
Hagerty Price Guide: N/A
Lot: 53

1937 Delahaye 135 M Coupe

Any 135 M is special, and since Delahaye wasn’t in the habit of building its own bodies, many of the great French coachbuilders of the day used a 135 M platform for their work. While Dubos Fréres isn’t one of the more well-known coachbuilders, this one-off coupe is as gorgeous as any of them, with a dramatic teardrop shape and two-tone paintwork. Bought new by a German diplomat in Spain, it has a fully documented history and has been completely restored. It also hasn’t been shown before, so it’s an ideal concours car.

1955 Hudson Italia
Presale estimate: $400,000 – $500,000
Hagerty Price Guide: $195,000 – $435,000
Lot: 15

1955 Hudson Italia

American cars with special Italian bodywork were not unheard of in the 1950s, but the Hudson Italia is one of the best known with its low profile Jet Age styling thanks to Hudson’s “step-down” floorpan. Only 26 Italias were assembled by Carrozzeria Touring, and this could be the best example that exists as it boasts a recent concours-level restoration. The last Italia to sell at auction was at Gooding’s Pebble Beach event two years ago. It went for $154,000, but that was a rough example without engine or transmission. Barrett-Jackson also sold one in solid restored condition for $396,000 four years ago.

1937 Lagonda LG45 Drophead Coupe
Presale estimate: $275,000 – $325,000
Hagerty Price Guide: N/A
Lot: 46

1937 Lagonda LG45 Drophead Coupe

In the second half of the 1930s, Lagonda retained the talents of W.O. Bentley and many of his staff, luring them away from Rolls-Royce. Lagonda’s straight-six engine was so good that David Brown bought and incorporated Lagonda into Aston Martin in the 1940s in large part just to acquire the six’s design. This example was owned and restored by an active Lagonda Club member and is a CCCA Full Classic™, so it’s eligible for a host of vintage car events.

1963 Morgan Plus Four Plus
Presale estimate: $175,000 – $225,000
Hagerty Price Guide: $74,700 – $209,000
Lot: 57

1963 Morgan Plus Four Plus

When introduced at the Earls Court Motor Show in 1963, the Morgan Plus Four Plus, with its streamlined fiberglass coupe bodywork and roll-up windows, was shunned by the Morgan traditionalists who seem to have always believed that sports car design peaked in the 1930s. Today, however, any one of the 26 Plus Four Pluses built is highly prized by collectors because it was such a radical step in a new direction for Morgan, even if it was an evolutionary dead end. The restored example on offer from Worldwide is also reported to be that very car that disappointed Morgan customers in 1963.

1948 Simca-Gordini Grand Prix Monoposto
Presale estimate: $250,000 – $350,000
Hagerty Price Guide: N/A
Lot: 24

1948 Simca-Gordini Grand Prix Monoposto

Despite the Italian name, Gordini was an ace tuner of French automobiles, eventually building its own cars and coming under the ownership of Renault. This odd little single seater is from Gordini’s early days and is powered by a 1,460-cc Simca engine. Unrestored, it is documented as having been driven by such famous divers as Prince Bira of Siam, Louis Chiron, and Jean-Pierre Wimille. When Wimille fatally crashed one of the Simca-Gordini cars in Argentina, the team left the remaining single seaters in Argentina. Other than a brief stint in Italy, the car has remained in storage in Argentina until recently.

Report by hagerty.com

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